Society: The Ultimate Villain

Carson and Brayden sit down to discuss how two characters from different media forms, Levana from The Lunar Chronicles and Carnage from Marvel comics, are psychologically the same. Topics include mass murder, manipulation, and other examples of something not quite right in the brain. If you thought these could only be achieved in literature, be prepared to hear some real world influences on these characters.

 

Many thanks to Marissa Meyer and David Michelinie for their works in creating these characters and allowing us to have these topics to discuss.

Fish Lovers Podcast

Have you ever thought about how Batman and Lord of the Rings are similar?

 

In this episode of Villain Studies we will be exploring the minds of two of our favorite fish-loving villains, Gollum, the creepiest creature from Middle Earth, and Penguin, the grossest villain of Gotham. These two villains may live in entirely different worlds, but they have some shocking similarities. We will be discussing their physical and psychological connections and how it affects their stories. Warning: Spoilers Ahead!

 

Click here for more information on Gollum, here for more information on Penguin, and here for more information on Erickson’s hierarchy of needs.

104 Days of Trauma

In this episode of the Podcasting miniterm, we will be talking about childhood trauma and how it affects villains in the future. Using psychological levels such as Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, we will be talking about the trauma villains Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz, Jason Vorhees, and Gollum/Smeagle. All three of these characters faced traumatic experiences that impacted their lives In one way or another.

 

Dr. Doofenshmirtz: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Heinz_Doofenshmirtz

Jason Vorhees: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jason_Voorhees

Gollum: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gollum

“Women, Am I Right?”: The Evolution of the Female Antagonist

Listen as Aly, Lucas, and Corra unravel the characteristics of female villains over the course of the past 50 years, and delve deeper into individual characters that exemplify the changing understanding of what it means to be an antagonist. From classic Disney evil queens (Cruella De Vil, the Evil Queen, and Ursula) to turn-of-the-century gaming bad girls (Amanda Everet and Natla) to nuanced modern-day super-women (Te Kā and Ghost), we analyze characters and explore the evolution of the media’s view of women.

Thank you to Walt Disney, Crystal Dynamics, and Stan Lee for the inspirations behind these amazing characters.

There’s Always a Copycat

A doppelganger, according to the Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, is a ghostly counterpart of a living person. In the media they are often portrayed as “The Evil Twin” or “A Clone” such as Goku Black , The Batman Who Laughs, and….. Voldemort? In this episode Gabe, Chase, and Natalie discuss the backgrounds and psychological backlash of some of our favorite fictional copycats, and how their past affects their everyday lives.

Masterpiece Cakeshop vs Colorado Civil Rights Commission

The case is about a cake shop (Masterpiece Cakes) versus the Colorado Civil Rights Commission. The Masterpiece Cake owner, who is Christian, refused to make a custom cake for a gay couple from Missouri. The couple filed a report that their rights were being violated. The court took up the case and ruled that the couple was in the right. The owner appealed, saying he had freedom of religion and that he had the right to refuse service based on beliefs. The case went to the Supreme Court and is now being discussed. There is no ruling yet.

Three sites were used as sources for this case. The first of them is the Alliance Defending Freedom website, which goes through the background of the shop owner and has a nice video that gives a good summary of the situation. The next site is The Humanist, a blog type of site where people can put their comments at the bottom, which I believe is nice because it allows people to share their own opinions. The final site is Oyez. This site shows the court dates, locations, and ruling. However, the ruling has not yet been declared, so it just says ”pending”.

Gill v Whitford

Does your vote count?

You’d hope so, but the truth is the results of many elections are decided before they even start. Parties use a tool called gerrymandering to redivide voting districts in favor of themselves. In this episode we discuss gerrymandering, and more specifically, the recent Gill v Whitford case pertaining to the republican party’s redivision of North Carolina’s districts in 2011.

General info:

https://www.oyez.org/cases/2017/16-1161

Name of plaintiffs and defendant, more background info:

http://www.campaignlegalcenter.org/case/gill-v-whitford

The video Joey tries and fails to explain via audio:

 

Carpenter v United States

It’s 2011. A series of armed robberies have been committed by a group of four. One of the four have been tracked down and interrogated. He gave the FBI the numbers for his partners, and the FBI got orders to check the numbers. The FBI then tracks down Timothy Carpenter as the person committing all of the crimes. He takes them to court, saying that this was against his 4th amendment right. While this case has not yet gone in front of the court, it is discussed what the ruling would be, and why it would be that way.

 

The oyez article we cited: https://www.oyez.org/cases/2017/16-402

We only used one place, as the people for research didn’t search too far, and most of the other sources just repeasted what oyez said.

Obergefell v Hodges

In this episode of Teens be Talkin’, Aidan, Liz, Noah, and Nicole talk about the Obergefell v Hodges supreme court case which legalized gay marriage in all fifty states. Then Liz interviews special quest Ms. Anderson.

Oyez was where we were able to find and listen to the oral arguments. https://www.oyez.org/cases/2014/14-556 is an excellent website for finding supreme court cases and listen to them debate it in court.

The New York times was where we found the reactions of people after the court’s decision.   https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/27/us/supreme-court-same-sex-marriage.html is one of the most popular news outlets in America.

The Washington Post was where we found the whole story of Obergefell v Hodges from how it started to the supreme court.https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/how-jim-obergefell-became-the-face-of-the-supreme-court-gay-marriage-case/2015/04/06/3740433c-d958-11e4-b3f2-607bd612aeac_story.html?utm_term=.ffe7dba5ebfb is also one of the most popular news outlets in America.

Cornell was where we found all the sections of the fourteenth amendment. https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/amendmentxiv is a free website that has records of all of the laws in America.

Justia is the site that contained all the final concurring and dissenting opinions of the Supreme Court justices.https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/576/14-556/dissent5.html is a free website that lets you contact a lawyer and find influential court cases.